Sleep Disorders studies

Sleep disorders can have direct and indirect direct health consequences for patients. They can result from—and sometimes increase risk of—certain health problems. Our researchers study conditions including sleep apnea and insomnia, their involvement in diseases such as cancer and kidney disease, and models of care for sleep apnea.

Approaches to Genetic Heterogeneity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

The main goal of this study is to use state of the art approaches to identify relevant genes based on a very large sample of patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), a common disorder with multiple adverse consequences. It is known that OSA has a genetic basis, but to date no convincing gene variants have been identified. This study uses OSA obtained from multiple institutions in the United States. It is the largest study ever proposed for identifying genes for this common sleep disorder.

Principal Investigator:

Corinna Koebnick, PhD, MSc

Funding Source:

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

Funding Years:

2016 - 2020

Biobehavioral Vulnerability to Accelerated Aging in Breast Cancer Survivors

The aim of this project is to examine cellular and genomic markers of inflammation, telomere erosion, telomere length, and microarray data of 300 breast cancer survivors and comparison women who are enrolled in the KPSC-UCLA collaborative STRIVE1 and STRIVE2 studies.

Site Principal Investigator:

Reina Haque, PhD, MPH

Funding Source:

American Cancer Society

Funding Years:

2016 - 2019

PAP Therapy and Acute Care Utilization in a Large Integrated Health System

This study will determine if clinically diagnosed sleep apnea for which a PAP machine has been prescribed is associated with a reduction in expensive acute care utilization and if significant variation in utilization exists to suggest treatment disparities.

Principal Investigator:

Stephen F. Derose, MD, MSHS

Funding Source:

ResMed Foundation

Funding Years:

2013 - 2016

Sleep Inflammation and Depression Occurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors (STRIVE1)

The aim of this prospective study is to examine the association between sleep disturbance, cellular and genomic markers of inflammation, and depression occurrence in breast cancer survivors.

Site Principal Investigator:

Reina Haque, PhD, MPH

Funding Source:

National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Funding Years:

2012 - 2017