Quality Improvement studies

Our researchers collaborate with clinicians to develop intervention studies to improve quality of care, much of it focusing on reducing errors and variations in treatment. Studies have been aimed at evaluating current programs for identifying or managing specific conditions, assessing the impact of an employer worksite clinic on care utilization, and reducing health care-associated infections such as sepsis and Clostridium difficile.

“Project ACHIEVE" (Achieving Patient-Centered Care and Optimized Health In Care Transitions by Evaluating the Value of Evidence)

The overall aims of this project are to identify which transitional care services and outcomes matter most to patients and caregivers, evaluate the comparative effectiveness of ongoing multi-component efforts at improving care transitions, and develop recommendations on best practices for the design, implementation and large-scale national spread of highly effective, patient-centered care transition programs.

Principal Investigator:

Huong Q. Nguyen, PhD, RN

Funding Source:

Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

Funding Years:

2015 - 2019

An In-Depth Interview Study of Immunization Providers in a Large Managed Care Organization to Understand Practice Patterns, Barriers and Facilitators for Administering the 3-Dose HPV Vaccine Series

The primary objective of this study is to identify immunization providers’ opinions on practice patterns, barriers and facilitators for Gardasil 3-dose regimen completion among those who initiated the Gardasil vaccine.

Principal Investigator:

Chun Chao, PhD, MS

Funding Source:

Merck Sharp and Dohme Corp.

Funding Years:

2013 - 2016

Care of Mental, Physical, and Substance Use Syndromes (COMPASS)

KPSC is one of nine sites throughout the country funded by an Innovation Award from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid to implement a coordinated care model for depressed patients with cardiovascular disease. We have the following goals for this project: 1. To implement in three stages a multiple condition collaborative care management model in primary care clinics of care systems in states. 2. To demonstrate that this model improves care quality, patient experience and health, provider satisfaction, and total healthcare costs for the Medicare and Medicaid patients with the targeted conditions. 3. To develop role descriptions and training for the two new types of workers required for this model – care managers and care consultants. 4. To identify the costs and payment models needed by care systems to sustain and spread this care model.

Principal Investigator:

Karen J. Coleman, PhD, MS

Funding Source:

Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI)

Funding Years:

2012 - 2015

Effects of Emergency Department Crowding on Patient Safety

We will determine if Emergency Department crowding results in worse patient outcomes. Emergency department crowding is a nationwide phenomenon affecting the acute care system. This proposal will assess the impact of visit-level exposures of emergency department crowding on patient safety outcomes, including death in the emergency department, inpatient, and outpatient settings. The long-term goal of this research program is to guide the design and evaluation of health systems interventions to mitigate the impacts of ED crowding on patient safety.

Principal Investigator:

Stephen F. Derose, MD, MSHS

Funding Source:

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)

Funding Years:

2010 - 2012

Program in Health Services Research and Implementation Science (HSR)

This funding supports infrastructure development and operationally focused research for a program in health services research and implementation science.

Principal Investigator:

Michael K. Gould, MD, MS

Funding Source:

Kaiser Foundation Hospitals, Inc. (KFH)

Funding Years:

2013